HUNZA TRAVEL

Posted by shuaib hunzai Sunday, February 28, 2010 0 comments

HUNZA TRAVEL

The valley is popularly believed to be the inspiration for the mythical valley of Shangri-la in James Hilton’s 1933 novel Lost Horizon. As one travels up on the Karakoram Highway, the beautiful sceneries keep on revealing themselves. On the way one can witness the 65 km long ‘Batura’ glacier, the second longest in Pakistan, surround by Shishper, Batura and Kumpirdior peaks. On reaching Sost one can continue the journey up to Khunzhrav or turn west to witness the mystic beauty of Chipursan (also Chapursan) valley. Chipursan valley has some of most exotic tourist spots in the area. In Yarzerech (also Yarzirich) you can have a look at the majestic Kundahill peak (6000 m), or trek along the Rishepzhurav to the Kundahill to experience the soothing sceneries. Beyond Yarzerech you can travel further to Lupghar, Raminj,Reshit,Yishkuk up to Bobo Ghundi (Oston), the shrine of Baba-e-Ghund, a saint from Afghanistan near the border between Pakistan and Wakhan region of Afghanistan.Is it safe to travel to Hunza? Yes it is very safe Hunza vally is about 650 kilometers from Swat and about 800 kilometers from waziristan the Afghan border, this region has never had any problem. The people in the valley are believers of His Highness the Aga Khan who gives his followers and the whole world message of brotherhood peace respect and pluralism.Not only Hunza valley is far from the trouble you don’t even have to fly to Pakistan’s major cities to get there you can come to Hunza via Khunjerab pass the highest paved road and border on earth. Extension of Hunza valley into your silk road will become highlight of the whole silkroad tour. Hunza is probably Pakistan’s most visited valley, by the tourists. It is a fairy tale land surrounded by beautiful rugged & snow capped mountains. Only at a distance of 100 Kms. from Gilgit Hunza is a small town on Karakorum Highway. At the altitude of 7000 – 800 feet it is the first main town or stop if you are entering Pakistan from China.The central Hunza known as Karimabad is basically a town of just 6 villages. The first main villages as you come from Gilgit on the main Karakorum Highway is Aliabad. There there are spectacular views of Rakaposhi mountain (7788 meters), PTDC Motel Hunza and other small hotels are located on the main Karakorum highway here. Just above Aliabad on the hill are Altit and Baltit villages the heart of Hunza. There is a very interesting Bazaar and two Forts in Altit & Baltit Villages. The Baltit fort has recently been restored and converted nto a guided museum.Hunza is undoubtly the Shangri-la of James Hilton’s novel The Lost Horizon. It is probably the most Photogenic point in the world. There are numerous tours and activities available from Hunza Below you will find some options for bus/culture tourist where as for the adventure lovers.

Karimabad:


As described above is the main bazaar of Hunza full of colorful shops with local dry fruits (Dried Apricots, Apricot Nut, Almonds, Walnuts Mulberry, etc.) At the end of bazaar is the Baltit village and Baltit fort which are restored by the Aga Khan fund for Culture & heritage. The fort has been brought into a guided museum you can spend time in the for visiting different sections of the fort and viewing the slide show in the small hall of the fort.
Duikar:

At an height of 10000 feet above sea level this is a beautiful spot to see sunrise. You can see 8 peaks above 7000 meters from here each gets the sun light one by one as sun rises.

Half Day Gulmit & Passu:
If you are not doing Khunjerab pass you must drive upto Passu for those (must See) views of the Karakorums in Gulmit & Passu. You can also have a walk in the Gulmit village and hike to Passu glacier. Scenery is beyond description. Yow will Just love it.

Full Day Khunjerab Pass:
Early morning 7AM or 8AM Drive to Khunjerab pass an extraordinary drive with beautiful view of mountains at the pass have some snack and walk a few steps in China later drive back to Sost for a Lunch . or carry Lunch boxes and do a picnic at Khunjerab National park. Return to Hunza late Afternoon.
Morning Sunrise Safari :

Drive early morning (Before Sunrise ) by jeep to Duikar (10000 ft altitude ) Watch the snowcapped mountains as sun lits all the snow capped peaks one by one, later have a breakfast in the wilderness return to the hotel in time for your other program.
Nagar & Hoper

Pick up from your hotel at 9AM or 2:30PM the duration of the tour is 4 hours you can take it either in the morning or afternoonDrive by jeep to the spectacular valley of Nagar across the Hunza river. Jeep ride is awesome. You see beautifully laid terraces for different crops and orchids. Jeep passes through the villages and the fruit orchids . At Hoper you get down and watch the Hoper glacier. If you feel like you may hike down to the glacier and have a great view of Kapal & Golden peaks.

Altit Baltit tour

Pick up from your hotel at 9AM or 2:30PM the duration of the tour is 3 – 4 hours you can take it either in the morning or afternoonVisit the newly restored Baltit fort a guided tour will be offered inside the fort emphasising the history of Hunza vally and architecture of Baltit fort which was made about 600- 400 years ago by Tibatan Artisans brought by the wife of Mir of Hunza. Late we will have an easy walk in Karimabad bazaar, we than drive to Altit for which is actually under renovation. If you desire we can also visit a school in Hunza or visit a family home in Hunza.
Hunza – Sost :

85Kms. 3 Hours with stops. it is a spectacular journey through some of the most interesting villages of Karakorum Highway. This transfer is more like an excursion as there are many photogenic points and we need to stop and see the magnificent scenery of the Karakorums. As we leave Karimabad we stop at the rock drawings on the road, later we stop at Gulmit to seea great view of cathedral , & Gulmit tower mountains. Later we make several stops for Passu, Shispar , Rakaposhi and other beautiful views. Sost is a small border town where only in the mornings there is some activity . You have to change to Government coach to go to China.

HUNZA BOIGRAPHY

172 Kilometers from the Khunjerab pass highest paved road on earth 100 Kilometers from the town of Gilgit and about 300 Kilometers from the Chinese town of Kashgar lies a firy tale land of Hunza. The pace where the height and magnitude is practically redefined. The mountains here are su gigantic that every thing else looks too small. The scenary is so spectacular that one feels as if he/she is riding in a picture frame or in a dream.Hunza vally is the land of the high Karakorum mountains. The central town Hunza valley is Karimabad situated at an elevation of 2,438 metres (7,999 feet). The administrative territory of Hunza is about 7,900 km² {3,050 mi²). Karimabad is the main town of Hunza and usually referred as Hunza itself, it being the hub of tourism in Hunza. Kirimabad was known as twin Village of Altit & Baltit in the old times when Hunza was an independent state ruled by the Mirs of Hunza. From Karimabad there are spectacular views of the surrounding mountains like, Ultar Sar, Rakaposhi, Bojahagur Duanasir
II, Ghenta Peak, Hunza Peak, Darmyani Peak, and Bublimating (Ladyfinger Peak), all 7,000 meters or higher. The visitors to Hunza are overwhelmed by the rugged charm, the fragrant breeze and the silver color water from the glaciers signing through tall, graceful poplar trees and the velvet-like green carpet of wheat fields, set against the background of snow-covered high mountains like Ultar & Rakaposhi. How to Get there?One can reach Hunza from Islamabad
Pakistan long drive to Gilgit and an other 100 Kilometers to Hunza there are also flights from Islamabad to Gilgit but since the flights are dependent on weather Driving is mostly the choice with overnight stops in between. The plus of driving is also due to the drive being on spectacular 8th wonder of the world the Karakorum Highway.From China One can reach Hunza from China there are daily buses of Chinese governments from Taxkorgan to Sost the first city of Hunza from Sost we will drive you to your hotel in Karimabad Hunza.
Weather in Hunza

The temperature in May is maximum 27 C and minimum 14 C. The October temperatures are: maximum 10 C and minimum 0 C.
PEOPLE

People of HunzaMost of the people of Hunza are Ismaili Muslims, followers of His Highness the Aga Khan. The local language is Brushuski, Urdu and English are also understood by a number of people. The fairy-tale like castle of Baltit, above Karimabad, is a Hunza landmark built abut 600 years ago. Stilted on massive legs, its wooden bay windows look out over the valley. Originally, it was used as the residence of the Mirs (the title of the former rulers of Hunza).Mountaineering and HikingHunza is ideal for mountaineering, trekking and hiking. Special permits are required for mountaineering. Please contact the Tourism Division, Government of Pakistan, Islamabad.

JEEP SAFARIS

The Journey along KKH (Karakoram Highway also known as eighth wonder of the world), world’s highest paved trade route connecting China and Pakistan,Viewpoints on the way to Hunza are exceptionally attractive forcing tourists to halt for a while in some places and for a day in the others. The highway turns east at Chalt and hugs Hunza River round the north side of Rakaposhi, at 7,788 meters (25,550 feet), the 27th highest mountain in the world. As you drive along, you catch intermittent glimpses of glaciers, gleaming white peaks and ridges surrounded by wide expense of smooth snow. Two of the best views of Rakaposhi are two kilometers past the petrol pump at the turning to Chalt where you come around a corner to find a great mass of Rakaposhi staring you down, and nine kilometers further on, where a sign-board displayed saying ?Rakaposhi viewpoint?. The two restaurants on either sides of the bridge are worth staying for some time, taking snaps of Rakaposhi, having lunch in an open elevated place and do some shopping. It takes an hour or so to get Karimabad (2500m). Staying in Karimabad and visiting around costs atleast two days. Baltit Fort (once the palace of Mir of Hunza, now renovated for tourists), Altit Fort (perched on a rocky cliff with a sheer 300 meter plunge to the Hunza river), Duiker (a high altitude tiny valley over Karimabad for a picturesque view of Hunza, Nagar and number of beautiful mountains including Rakaposhi and Diran), and Hoper glacier are the most wonderful places to visit during the stay.

Day 01: Arrival at the airport Islamabad/Lahore and transfer to the
Hotel if Lahoreairport then drive to Islamabad for overnight

Day 02: Early morning drive to Chilas. Approximately 10 hours driving,
Or by air to Gilgit.

Day 03: Drive to Gulmit Hunza, 7 hrs from Chilas and 4 hrs from the
way you can view he Rakaposhi Peak, 7788m, Lunch Gilgit . On at
Rakaposhi view point and the proceed to Upper Hunza,overnight in Passu

Hunza

Day 04: A day excursion to Khunjerab Pass (approx. 7 hrs driving), the border between China and Pakistan. The altitude of the pass is 4,877Mtrs. Khunjerab Top is a broad, grassy saddle flanked on all side by snowy peaks. Overnight at Gulmit.

Day 05: A day for easy trekking, exploring Ghulkin-Borith Lake via the . Ghulkin glacier It is around 4 to 5 hrs trekking to go arround and if you will proceed further 2km you will reach the Passu white glacier.It is also possible to go around the village to cultural experience

Day 06: Drive to karamabad . This day you can visit the Baltit Fort at and Bazaar over night at Hunza karamabad

Day 07: Drive to beshim stop in route for lunch (Chilas) and over night Beshim hotel (approx 9hrs Drive)

Day 08: The last day of your journey if your time allows you visit Taxila on the way back to Islamabad it take 6 hrs drives.

Day 09: Drive to the airport and fly to destination

HUNZA MOUNTAINS

Posted by shuaib hunzai Friday, February 26, 2010 0 comments

LADY FINGER
Slightly foreshortened view of Lady Finger (6000m, left) & Hunza Peak (6270m, right). These are among Hunza’s most famour peaks. The photo was taken from Ultar Meadow which is a couple of hours climb from Hunza’s capital, Karimabad. I took the photo mid-June. During July/August there is little snow on these faces.



DIRAN PEAK

Diran(7273m) also known as Minapin Peak is situated between Rakaposhi and Haramosh Massif of Karakoram Range offering one of the most beautiful sceneries in Hunza valley. Diran stands prominently offering a Panoramic view to Hunza valley adding to its rugged beauty. The South face is dominating the Bagrot valley
also visible from Karakoram Highway. This face is little more difficult yet safer for snow and ice avalanches. It is situated in the Rakaposhi and Haramosh region in the vicinity of Minapin, Hinarchi and Baultar glaciers. The entire ascent is on snow slopes with bare rock only peeping here and there. The higher slope is smooth but wind-blown. It is very easily accessible because of its proximity to the Karakoram Highway.
RAKAPOSHI


Rakaposhi stands at 7,788m (25,550 feet) and is the 27th highest mountain of the world. Although not the highest, it is regarded as one of the most beautiful






HUNZA ULTER PEAK.




best view of ulter peak reflections in the rush lake. Ulter is the beautifull peak of hunza it so difficult for climber.many tourist come here for enjoying the beautiful place.






HIGHEST MOUNTAIN OF PAKISTAN K2

K2 peak, locally known by the name of “Chogo Ri”, which means “The Great Mountain”, 8,611m, is the 2nd highest mountain in the world. K2 is placed on the Pakistan – China border in the mighty Karakoram range.
With no simple routes, K2 is known as the finest and most dangerous mountain in the world. This is because of the massiveness in the size of this mountain and the numerous unsuccessful attempts made on it by various expeditions, which include mostly American expeditions.









About K2
K2 is a rocky mountain up to 6,000m, beyond which it becomes an ocean of snow. The traditional route to K2’s base camp goes from Skardu, which is linked with Islamabad by a good road. From Skardu the route goes via Shigar-Dassu-Askole up to Concordia over the Baltoro glacier.
K2 was firstly discovered and measured by the Survey of India in 1856, and first named for English topographer Henry Godwin – Austen, who explored and surveyed the region.
K2 is taken from the first letter of Karakorum, and the number indicates that it was the second peak in the range to be measured. K2 was firstly climbed on July,31 1954 by Italian climbers team lead by Ardito Desio and accompanying him were Lino Lacedelli and Achille Compagnoni. A March 1987 measurement of K2 indicated that it might be higher than Everest, but later that year, Everest was re-measured by a similar method and found to indeed be 778 ft (237m) taller.
The Korakoram Range
Karakorum or Karakoram, mountain range, extending 480-kms, between the Indus and Yarkant rivers, North Kashmir, South central Asia; South Easy extension of the Hindu Kush mountain range. It covers disputed territory, held by China on the north, India on the east, and Pakistan on the west. Karakorum’s main range has some of the world’s highest peaks, including K2 called Mt. Godwin-Austen, the second highest peak in the world.Karakorum also has several of the world’s largest glaciers. Its southern slopes are the watershed for many tributaries of the Indus River. The mountains, which are the greatest barrier between India and Central Asia, are crossed above the perpetual snow line by two natural routes. Karakorum Pass (18,290 ft/5,575 m), is the chief pass on the main Kashmir – China route. Another important pass, Khunjerab (Kunjirap) Pass (15,420 ft/4,700m), is on the Pakistan – China route.

Henry Godwin-Austin




Godwin-Austen, was a English topographer and geologist. An officer in the British army (1851-77), he was assigned to several government surveys in North India, especially among the Himalayas. He explored and surveyed the region of the Karakorum around K2, which is also known as Mt. Godwin-Austen after him.

HERITAGE OF HUNZA

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Hunza is a fairy tale land and a lot of myth and reality has been associated to it. One thing is true of all that Hunza people are probably the most friendly people in the region. In the past it was quite common to see people crossing 100 and more years this indeed is true and can still be seen to some extent however the modern civilization has changed a lot in this valley of the longativity.

The Hunza people, or Hunzakuts are people who have lived centuries in their very own isolated valleys. They speak Wakhi and the Shina. The Wakhi reside in the upper part of Hunza locally called Gojal. Wakhis also inhabit the bordering regions of China, Tajikstan and Afghanistan and also live in Gizar and Chitral district of Pakistan. The Shina-speaking people live in the southern part of Hunza. They could have come from Chilas, Gilgit, and other Shina-speaking areas of Pakistan many centuries ago.

The Hunzakuts and the region of Hunza have one of the highest literacy rates as compared to other similar districts in Pakistan due to the interest of His Higness Karim Aga Khan whom most of the Hunzakuts follow as their spritual leader.

Local legend states that Hunza may have been associated with the lost kingdom of Shangri La which was mentioned in the Novel of James Hilton “The Lost Horizon”. The people of Hunza are by some noted for their exceptionally long life expectancy, others describe this as a longevity myth and cite a life expectancy of 53 years for men and 52 for women, although with a high standard deviation.

The Broshuski or Burusho or Brusho people live in the Hunza, Nagar, and Yasin valleys of northern Pakistan. There are also over 300 Burusho living in Srinagar, India. They are predominantly Muslims. Their language, Burushaski, has not been shown to be related to any other. They have an East Asian genetic contribution, suggesting that at least some of their ancestry originates north of the Himalayas.
BALTIT FORT:
Baltit Fort is situated in Karimabad, once was capital of the state of Hunza, now Tehsil Headquarter of District Gilgit. It is approached by Karakuram Highway from Gilgit, the capital of Northern Areas, Pakistan. The Baltit Fort stands on a artificially flattened spur below the Ulter Glacier. Strategically located with a commanding view of the Hunza Valley and its Tributaries, its inhabitants controlled the seasonal trans-Karakuram trade between south and Central Asia. The Baltit Fort is rectangular in plan with three floors and stands on a high stone plinth Fig-I. Whilts the ground floor consist mainly of storage chambers, the first floor is oriented around as open hall. A staircase leads to the second floor which was mainly used during the winter months and contains an audience hall, guest room, dining hall, kitchen and servants quarters. A further staircases leads up to the third floor which is partly open to the elements and contains the summer dining room, audience chamber, bedroom and reception hall. Inhabited by the Mir, or ruler of Hunza until 1945. The conservation work carried out in the 1990 indicated that the core of the structures, a single defensive timber and stone tower, had been built in the eight century A.D. This tower was augmented by additional towers and linked by a single story construction consisting of small rooms and sub-surface storage chambers. The complex was then later expanded by the addition of a second, and then a third floor. The structure’s stone walls, built in an area of frequent seismic movements, were provided with a traditional internal framework of timber for greater stabilisation.

::HISTORY OF BALTIT FORT::

In olden times a number of small independent states existed in the history of Northern Areas of Pakistan. Among them Hunza and Nager were the traditional rival states, situated on opposite sides of the Hunza (kanjut) river. The rulers of these two states, known as Thámo / Mirs (Th?m=S), built various strongholds to express their power.

According to historical sources {Ref: Tarikh-e-Ehd Atiiq Riyasat Hunza by Haji Qudratullah Baig, Pub: S.T.Printers Rawalpindi 1980 Pakistan}, the Hunza rulers initially resided in the Altit Fort, but later as a result of a conflict between the two sons of the ruler Sultan, Shah Abbas (Sh?boos) and Ali Khan (Aliqh?n), Shaboos shifted to the Baltit Fort, making it the capital seat of Hunza. The power struggle between the two brothers eventually resulted in the death of younger one, and so Baltit Fort further established itself as the prime seat of power in the Hunza state.

The rich beauty of Baltit Fort can be traced to over seven hundred 700 years ago. Ayasho II, Tham / Mir of Hunza in the early 15th fifteenth century married Princess Shah Khatoon (Sha Qhatun) from Baltistan (In Moghul history Baltistan is called Tibet Khurd mean, little Tibet), and was the first to modify the face of Altit and, subsequently Baltit Fort. Baltistan meaning land of Balti people had a very strong cultural and ethnical relation with the Ladakh territory of India then. Consequently, the structure of Baltit Fort was influenced by the Ladakhi / Tibetan architecture, with some resemblance to the Potala palace in Lahasa

In olden times a number of small independent states existed in the history of Northern Areas of Pakistan. Among them Hunza and Nager were the traditional rival states, situated on opposite sides of the Hunza (kanjut) river. The rulers of these two states, known as Thámo / Mirs (Th?m=S), built various strongholds to express their power.

According to historical sources {Ref: Tarikh-e-Ehd Atiiq Riyasat Hunza by Haji Qudratullah Baig, Pub: S.T.Printers Rawalpindi 1980 Pakistan}, the Hunza rulers initially resided in the Altit Fort, but later as a result of a conflict between the two sons of the ruler Sultan, Shah Abbas (Sh?boos) and Ali Khan (Aliqh?n), Shaboos shifted to the Baltit Fort, making it the capital seat of Hunza. The power struggle between the two brothers eventually resulted in the death of younger one, and so Baltit Fort further established itself as the prime seat of power in the Hunza state.

The rich beauty of Baltit Fort can be traced to over seven hundred 700 years ago. Ayasho II, Tham / Mir of Hunza in the early 15th fifteenth century married Princess Shah Khatoon (Sha Qhatun) from Baltistan (In Moghul history Baltistan is called Tibet Khurd mean, little Tibet), and was the first to modify the face of Altit and, subsequently Baltit Fort. Baltistan meaning land of Balti people had a very strong cultural and ethnical relation with the Ladakh territory of India then. Consequently, the structure of Baltit Fort was influenced by the Ladakhi / Tibetan architecture, with some resemblance to the Potala palace in Lahasa. Then additions, renovations and changes to the building were being made through the centuries by the long line of rulers of the Hunza that followed.

A veritable treasure house for ancient forts, the Northern Areas of Pakistan lost most of its glorious built heritage around the 19th century as a result of the destructive attacks by the Maharja of Kashmir.

However, in this regard people of Hunza were exceptionally fortunate to successfully defend against the invasions of Maharaja Kashmir four times.

{Ref: Tribes of Hindoo Koosh by John Biddulph Chapter: II Page: 29, Pub: The Superintendent of Government Printing-Calcutta India 1880, Reprint: Ali Kamran Publishers, Lahore-Pakistan 1995. First attack 1848, 2nd attack: 1865, 3rd attack 1866 and 4rth attack 1888 Ref: Beg Qudratullah}

One of the biggest changes in the structure of Baltit Fort came with the invasion of British in December 1891. Tham / Mir Safdarali Khan, ruler of Hunza his wazir Dadu (Thara Baig III), fled to Kashgar (China) for political asylum with their fellows and families. With the conquest of Hunza and Nager states by the British forces in December 1891, the fortified wall and watch towers of the old Baltit village and watch towers of the Baltit Fort on its north-western end were also demolished as desired by the British authorities.

The British installed his younger brother Tham / Mir Sir Muhammad Nazim Khan K.C.I.E, as the ruler of Hunza state in September 1892 {Ref: History of Northern Areas of Pakistan by Prof. A.H.Dani, Page:285 Pub: Sang-e-Meel Publications, Lahore Pakistan www.sang-e-meel.com, Reprinted: 2007}.

During his reign, Tham / Mir Nazeem Khan made several major alterations to the Baltit Fort. He demolished a number of rooms of third floor and added a few rooms in the British colonial style on the front elevation, using lime wash and colour glass panel windows.Baltit Fort remained officially inhabited until 1945, when the last ruler of Hunza, Mir Muhammad Jmamal Khan, moved to a new palace further down the hill, where the present Mir of Hunza Mir Ghazanfar Ali Khan (Current Chief Executive of Northern Areas) and his family are residing.

With no proper authority entrusted to care for it, the Fort was exposed to the ravages of time and over the years its structure weakened and began to deteriorate. His Highness Aga Khan IV initiated the restoration efforts for Baltit Fort in 1990, when Mir Ghazanfar Ali Khan the son of last ruler of Hunza, Tham / Mir Muhammad Jamal Khan and his family generously donated the Fort to the Baltit Heritage Trust, a public charity formed for the explicit purpose of owning and maintaining the Fort.

©E.U.Baig Sir Mir Muhammad Nazim Khan K.C.I.E & Khan Bahadur Wazir Humayun Baig Dehli Darbar 1911

Sir Mir Muhammad Nazim Khan K.C.I.E & Khan Bahadur Wazir Humayun Baig Dehli Darbar 1911 (Courtesy by: E.U.Baig)

Mir Mohd Jamal Khan (d. 1976)

Mir Ghazanfar Ali Khan (Current Chief Executive of N.A’s)

Mir Mohd Jamal Khan (d. 1976)

Mir Ghazanfar Ali Khan (Current Chief Executive of N.A’s)

The restoration undertaken by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture in Geneva in association with the Aga Khan Cultural Service Pakistan (Pakistan), took six years to complete.

The project was supported by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture as the main donor through its Historic Cities Support Programme, as well as by the Getty Grant Program (USA), NORAD (Norway) and the French Government. The restored Fort, resplendent in its regal glory was inaugurated on September 29, 1996 in the presence of His Highness the Aga Khan IV and the president of Pakistan Farooq Ahmad Khan Laghari. It is now operated and maintained by the Baltit Heritage Trust and is open to visitors. Preservation at its best, the Baltit Fort serves as a perfect example of culture restored and preserved for the future generations of the mountain people.

ALTIT FORT

The majestic historical Altit fort is center of attraction due to its architectural design and strategic location. Altit is one of the oldest settlements of Hunza valley. During the time when Hunza was under the central government of Gilgit principality, Altit served as the capital and sitting place of Hunza. Altit is the birth place of the Hunza Kingdom and Altit fort is the first fort of the region. During early period of former Hunza state Altit was the capital. The artisans from Baltistan who accompanied the wife of Mir Ayasho II constructed this fort during 1540s A.D. The fort has been constructed in six different stages by using various natural levels of the rock. The construction has been made right on the edge of a sheer rock cliff that drops 1000 feet straight down to the Hunza River.
In the beginning it was built as a palace, soon after the addition of the watch tower a defensive architectural element it transformed to a fort. There is great possibility that different stages of the fort have been constructed during different times because the actual age of the fort is said to be more than 800 years. However, the date of construction on the fort tower is written as 955 A.H/1548 A.D thus the age is calculated as 458 years. This fort is said to be around 50-100 years older than the Baltit Fort. When the state capital transferred to Altit it remained vacant and occasionally used as a guest house. The fort was in disposal of Raja Amin Khan who donated it to Aga Khan Cultural Services, Pakistan (AKCSP) in 2001. AKCSP after some emergency repairs is now working to preserve this historical heritage.

HUNZA PEOPLE

Posted by shuaib hunzai Thursday, February 25, 2010 0 comments

Hunza, a remote mountain kingdom, may have been the inspiration behind James Hilton’s “Shangri-La.” The area opened up in the 1970s following the completion of the Karakoram Highway (KKH); an engineering marvel tracing the old silk route from Pakistan into China. The fair skinned and light-eyed Hunzakuts claim to be descendants of soldiers lost from Alexander’s army as he invaded India. Their language, Burushaski, provides linguists an enigma as it is unrelated to any other language known to man. The beauty of this mountain paradise is matchless; from the soft blossoms of the apricot trees to the dark snowcapped rock monuments of Rakaposhi (7788 m.) and recently climbed Ultar (7388 m.) jabbing a vivid blue backdrop high above..

* People of Hunza
* The fair skinned and light-eyed Hunzakuts claim to be descendants of soldiers lost from Alexander’s army as he invaded India. Their language, Burushaski, provides linguists an enigma as it is unrelated to any other language known to man.

* These people are known world over for their amazing longevity and health. They live well beyond 100 years and have commonly been known to still father children at the age of 110. The Hunza has no known incidence of cancer
One of the main activities of the locals is the cultivation of apricots. So that is why all the roofs in this neighborhood are coloured orange, because of the apricots who are drying in the sun. Maybe a good idea for a gift, a portion of dried apricots. But be careful when you make such a picture, as it is kind of prohibited to make pictures of the local ladies in this region, and the drying of the apricots is their duty.

When you stand on the terrace of the Baltit Fort in Karimabad, it is almost impossible to stop looking around to those magnificent high mountains. But stop looking up, you must also look down, because from the terrace of the Baltit Fort you also have a splendid bird’s eye view on the houses of the village Karimabad. What a great view, you should not miss that.
Most littoral sense of the word. Just walk down the Karokoram Highway staring at the awesome mountains. just incredible. these photos dont do them justice
The Hunza Valley, at around 8,500 feet, is enclosed by mountain peaks as high as 25,550 ft is located in the far northeast of Pakistan, is a lush valley of fruit trees and fertile land.
Over the years, many studies have been done on the longevity of the people of Hunza, reports have stated that it is the fitness of the elderly that is so unsual. Although there are few written records of births or deaths most families know the season when they were born and the year. Many elderly say that it is the pure foods, lack of stress in their life and clean air that has allowed them to live a healthy lifestyle.

HUNZA WATER

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HUNZA WATER

This Hunza water recipe using Karakorum & Himalayan rock salt comes from simple at-home and an easily obtained inexpensive gourmet ingredient. You and nature create this Hunza water. It’s inspired by research discovered from several longevity societies, not just the Hunza people. The term “Hunza water” popularized the idea of “live,” pristine and highly mineralized water enough to warrant its further study, so we’ll name this recipe Hunza water.

Various isolated societies discovered by doctors, explorers and university professors surprisingly had a water source that some call “glacial milk:” pristine water that tumbles through the sunlight over mountain and ancient sea bed minerals. The idea of Hunza water– whether or not the Hunzas were the healthiest of the longevity societies found – opened up a new awareness in health, so this recipe called Hunza water is a combination of ancient Himalayan “live” minerals (Himalayan rock salt) and water with enhanced “chi” from the sun, all from the easily accessed inexpensive fair trade ingredient called Himalayan pink salt or Himalayan rock salt, water, and a sunny window.
It isn’t mysterious and woo-woo – Himalayan pink rock salt is sought out and used by gourmet chefs from around the world. But it does have almost mysterious reported health qualities: It is widely reported to be from a 250 million year old ancient sea bed from a pristine eco-system, contains at least 84 minerals that match the human body’s “inner sea” when in perfect health, heals us from a refined salt diet while tasting delicious and satisfying our salt craving, helps return the body to its highest vibrational state.

To get this “live” vibrational quality, this Hunza water uses a product called sole made as described below.
Himalayan pink rock salt used in this Hunza water recipe comes to us in fair trade manner in ground powder the consistency of table sea salt for use as one would table salt, as larger chunks about the size of rocks you could hold in one hand, larger gourmet cooking slabs and salt lamps that cleanse the air with negative ions. For this Hunza water, you want the larger chunks the size of a hand-held rock. I can get these chunks from my regular grocery store for around $3 each. Online I’ve seen them for about $30 per 2 pounds. This Hunza water recipe cannot be replicated by simply dissolving ground powdered Himalayan pink table salt into a glass of water. Somehow proponents of making sole say it’s healing charge doesn’t take place that way, and sole actually contains far less sodium than sprinkling ground salt in water, while saturating the water with the 84 minerals and giving it the life vibration we’re seeking.


Suggested Uses for Hunza Water:


Hunza Water is a catalytic structured water which, when added to other liquids, enhances their solvency power by altering their molecular structure.


Use Hunza Water concentrate in all your drinking water.
Use it in other beverages, especially juice and tea.
Use on cut flowers to maintain their freshness.
Use to rinse vegetables and fruits.
Use to catalyze your bath or spa water.
Use to wet your toothbrush or add to your favorite mouthwash.
Use to prevent nicks while shaving.
Use it with your shampoo, other hair care products and body lotion.

Abstracts are available of 10 Evaluation Studies of Hunza Water, A Functional Silicate Nanocolloid:

* Hunza Water has anti-aging benefits through antioxidation and alkalisation.
* Hunza Water has helped in natural pain relief from headaches, sore muscles, fibromyalgia and inflammation of the joints.
* Hunza Water Effectively Lowers Blood Lactic Acid Levels During Strenuous Exercise
* Hunza Water Protects Against Oxidative Stress (free radical damage) as a Scavenger of Free Radicals
* Hunza Water enhances hydration of all tissues especially in the elderly
* Hunza Water increases production of the energy molecule adenosine triphosphate or ATP by enhancing Mitochondrial NADH Production
* Physician Using Hunza Water Climbed Mount Everest Without Oxygen
* Aging Marathon Runner On Hunza Water Improves Time
* Safety Studies have been done with Hunza Water: Acute Oral Toxicity Study; Pre-Clinical Trial With Human Subjects Taking Hunza Water.

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